(((My Fellow Americans))) #85: Lennie Jarratt

(((My Fellow Americans)))


About This Episode

Government has made education into a giant mess, which is a shock to exactly no one. From No Child Left Behind to Common core, students are being treated like statistics, and the stats are bad.

Thankfully, there are alternatives. Spike’s guest tonight is Lennie Jarratt, former director of the Center for Education Opportunities at The Heartland Institute, and he’s coming on talk with Spike about reforming the education system through free market solutions.

Spike will not rest until America’s education is solved. Tonight.

Spike Twitter

Spike Facebook

Libertarian Party Waffle House Caucus

Chris Reynolds, Attorney at Law

Intro & Outro Music by JoDavi.


Episode Transcript

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This episode transcript is auto-generated and a provided as a service to the hearing impaired. We apologize for any errors or inaccuracies.
FULL TRANSCRIPT TEXT

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i’ll be
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buried in my grave
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before i become a slave yes
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that is
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we have solely changed
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that is
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we have sorely changed
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south carolina you’re watching my
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folks my guest tonight is an absolute
06:52
champion
06:53
for education he’s actually the former
06:55
managing editor
06:56
editor of champion news i told you he
06:58
was a champion and also of education
07:00
matters which are
07:01
two publications that are focused on
07:03
education reform he has talked about
07:05
education reform on
07:06
fox news abc chicago
07:09
multiple other radio outlets and
07:11
newspapers and websites across the u.s
07:14
he has been a presenter on panels
07:16
discussing education choice
07:17
common core homeschooling and the
07:20
illinois freedom of information laws
07:22
with groups such as american majority
07:24
americans for prosperity
07:26
illinois tea party groups homeschool
07:28
conventions and state legislative
07:30
hearings
07:30
and he is on here tonight with me spike
07:33
cohen
07:33
and we will not rest until we have
07:35
single-handedly solved
07:37
the education crisis here in this
07:39
country that is my
07:40
solemn promise to you and i just made it
07:42
on behalf of lenny as well ladies and
07:44
gentlemen
07:45
my fellow americans please welcome to
07:47
the show
07:48
my great my guest lenny jarrett lenny
07:50
thanks so much for coming on man
07:52
oh thanks for having me on spike this
07:54
will be a lot of fun
07:56
yeah i’m really looking forward to it
07:57
this is a topic that is near and dear to
07:59
me and i i really look forward to
08:01
talking with you about this
08:02
and folks be sure to chime in with your
08:04
thoughts and questions
08:05
muddied admins are standing by and lenny
08:07
and i will let you know
08:09
if you are right or wrong now lenny
08:13
just out of curiosity i’m reading about
08:14
your bio and i’m i’m i’m hearing all the
08:17
things that you’ve done you you are
08:18
absolutely fantastic when it comes to
08:20
education reform
08:21
what got you into this like what was
08:22
there a moment that just made you
08:24
realize you had to
08:26
make your your basically make your your
08:28
life’s advocacy focus on education or
08:30
was it sort of a
08:31
a cumulative thing everyone has their
08:34
story for why they do what they do
08:35
tell us the the lenny jarrett story well
08:38
i kind of got
08:39
started because i was actually
08:43
researching a school referendum in my
08:44
local public school district
08:47
and about two weeks into doing that
08:50
the website i put up to pl placed all my
08:53
foia requests
08:54
and everything all the information i get
08:55
back i was like everybody to try to
08:56
decide what they wanted
08:58
my website got hacked and i turned out
09:00
to have a cyber stalker for about six
09:03
years
09:04
and found out it was a husband of a
09:06
teacher in the local school district
09:08
and the more they pushed me the more i
09:10
pushed back and the more i researched
09:12
and figured out what was wrong with the
09:14
public school system
09:16
per say for the most part who was
09:17
running it and what the problems were
09:20
and that just led me down this whole
09:21
path of okay
09:23
education choices actually the answer
09:25
parents need to be empowered instead of
09:27
all the power being in the hands
09:29
of local bureaucrats federal bureaucrats
09:32
and state bureaucrats
09:34
so it was at this is fascinating so you
09:36
were hacked
09:38
and you said you found out who it was
09:41
and you said i’m gonna show them
09:43
i’m going to fix you know i’m going to
09:45
uh you know eliminate a problem that
09:47
that
09:48
this this man’s i guess wife is was a
09:50
part of with the with the teachers
09:51
unions or whatever
09:52
yep yep she was and it wasn’t i at the
09:55
time i didn’t
09:56
understand exactly what the problems
09:58
were right i just was kind of trying to
10:00
find out to see if they needed a tax
10:02
referendum
10:03
so they turned me a mild manner computer
10:06
programmer into an education reform
10:09
expert and advocate by attacking me and
10:12
continuing to attack me
10:14
over and over again so i just kept
10:16
digging until i found out what the real
10:17
problem
10:18
was and i did find out what the real
10:20
problem was parents
10:21
don’t have any power right now and
10:23
that’s the issue right
10:24
right so you’re like the batman of
10:27
education reform
10:28
you were just a mild-mannered guy and
10:30
then they came after you
10:32
and they kept coming after you and
10:33
eventually you said enough
10:35
and or you actually kept more and more
10:37
saying enough and now you are
10:39
here talking with a jew in his basement
10:41
and this is uh
10:42
this is absolutely this is perfect well
10:45
hey man thanks so much for coming
10:46
i want to ask you lenny 50 years ago as
10:49
you know or roughly 50 years ago
10:51
the federal department of education was
10:53
created
10:54
with the intention of increasing
10:56
literacy rates and
10:57
lowering the student-to-teacher ratio
11:00
and they’ve spent uh
11:01
inclu once you factor in inflation they
11:03
have spent well over two trillion
11:05
dollars almost three trillion dollars
11:07
and all of those things have gotten
11:09
worse during that time so i i would
11:11
assume that we can agree that the
11:12
federal government has done a bad job
11:14
but
11:14
is that where it started or was it
11:17
before that and if so what what
11:18
actually led to is what what was the
11:20
catalyst that started making education
11:22
so bad in the u.s to begin with
11:24
well the federal intervention really
11:27
kind of got it
11:28
kicked off more and more and more i mean
11:30
but actually something you might want to
11:32
know is the
11:32
department of education was actually
11:34
created about 168 years ago
11:37
people didn’t want it as a department so
11:39
it became
11:40
an office underneath the commerce
11:43
department
11:44
up until the 1970s when jimmy carter
11:46
elevated it back to the department
11:48
back to a full department cabinet status
11:51
that’s interesting
11:52
but yeah they started the federal
11:54
government started intervening actually
11:55
back
11:56
in the 30s and 40s and under the guise
11:58
of oh we need more farming programs we
12:01
need all this so they wanted to require
12:02
that
12:03
and the more intervention the federal
12:05
government did into the states
12:07
the worse education kind of became they
12:10
took more
12:11
the control did was was no longer local
12:14
and then the states started taking more
12:15
and more control because they had to
12:17
answer to the feds
12:19
and so this never-ending cycle of
12:21
intervention
12:22
into local education lenny
12:25
are you telling me that the more
12:28
government
12:29
takes power away from citizens
12:32
and centralizes it into the hands of
12:35
politicians
12:36
and bureaucrats and cronies that that
12:38
somehow makes things
12:41
worse yep imagine that
12:44
i’m shocked i’m sure i’m going to need a
12:46
minute just to process that no
12:48
so okay so so this is actually something
12:50
that has been kind of sl in in a similar
12:53
way with healthcare
12:54
healthcare problems didn’t start with
12:56
obamacare or even with medicare and
12:58
medicaid
12:58
this is stuff that really started in
13:00
earnest uh uh shockingly enough uh
13:03
between the period of woodrow wilson and
13:04
fdr so it sounds like kind of a similar
13:06
thing with this what
13:07
what were some of the first things that
13:09
happened that really kicked off
13:10
you know the the the the the
13:13
centralization of of healthcare and the
13:15
and the uh ensuing
13:17
collapse of results that happen as a
13:19
result of that
13:21
um i’m not as familiar with how the
13:23
centralization for health care happened
13:25
and stuff like that
13:26
i’m sorry i mean no no no i’m sorry i
13:28
meant education i apologize yeah
13:30
well it really was you know actually
13:33
after
13:34
jimmy carter did that then there was
13:37
the the education secretary under ronald
13:40
reagan
13:41
put out that report came a book a nation
13:44
at risk
13:45
which then the federal government and
13:46
you know congressmen and legislators all
13:49
think
13:50
we have to do something about this
13:51
because education is going the wrong way
13:53
so they feel like oh we got to do
13:55
something about this so the but then the
13:57
more they do
13:58
the worse it gets because they put all
14:00
this control in the federal departments
14:02
of education
14:03
so the state depart state groups
14:05
education departments have to file
14:08
even now with the federal department any
14:11
of their education plans if they want to
14:12
change something they’re going through
14:14
the federal department of education
14:16
on how they’re going to fix things and
14:18
how they’re going to do things
14:19
that’s why right now the teachers unions
14:22
and the public schools get so upset
14:23
whenever states are looking at doing any
14:25
type of school choice
14:27
because that takes that that child then
14:30
is out from under
14:31
the state and then from under the
14:32
federal government
14:34
so they can’t interfere with their
14:36
education anymore so
14:37
it it makes it it’s all actually if you
14:40
follow the money it’s really about the
14:41
money the more
14:42
children they’re educated the public
14:43
school system the more money the state
14:46
spends and then the more money that the
14:47
federal government spends
14:49
so they control a lot more that way so
14:52
you know this is the cycle
14:54
of government failure right government
14:56
fails at something
14:57
or makes it worse they use that as a
15:00
pretext for even more control
15:02
um and then as a result of that things
15:05
you know
15:06
there’s more power taken from people and
15:09
more infringement on their
15:10
on their rights and on their property
15:11
they’re robbed more and more of their
15:13
ability to make choices and the money
15:15
with which they can
15:16
make those choices effectively and then
15:18
they fail even harder
15:19
repeating the cycle that that continues
15:21
so you know yes
15:24
here are some more recent examples of
15:27
uh of how this ends up playing out or
15:30
uh there was the uh no child left behind
15:33
bill that happened during uh george bush
15:36
or as i call it an increasing number of
15:37
children being left behind
15:39
uh because that’s really what it is or
15:41
another way to call it is the
15:43
scantronization of education
15:45
uh where you know it’s increasingly just
15:47
well i’m gonna let you talk about it
15:48
what what
15:49
what happened with no child left behind
15:51
and and and how did that
15:53
create the even worsening of of
15:56
education i keep wanting to say
15:57
healthcare
15:57
of education if i say healthcare assume
16:00
i’m saying education and blame it
16:02
blame it on public schooling too yeah
16:06
yeah well no child left behind just
16:08
basically again it just gave more
16:10
control to the federal government
16:11
through the department of education
16:13
so that they could regulate and do more
16:15
stuff actually it’s about
16:16
eight percent of the money comes from
16:18
the federal government into the public
16:20
to a local public school right but it’s
16:22
over 40
16:23
of the regulations are from the federal
16:25
government
16:27
so you can see the disconnect right
16:29
there if it was only eight percent
16:31
of the regulations came from the federal
16:32
government with eight percent of the
16:34
money
16:34
right we actually wouldn’t have as big a
16:36
problem as we have right now
16:38
so nearly half of the regulation is
16:41
coming from the government
16:43
and all of the money is coming from the
16:45
taxpayer let’s be clear
16:46
when we’re talking federal money that’s
16:48
our money when we’re talking state money
16:49
or
16:50
even school district money that’s our
16:52
money that’s being
16:53
that’s being spent but so they’re only
16:55
giving
16:56
uh eight percent of the total funding
16:58
that’s happening but they’re putting in
16:59
which explains why there’s been i i wish
17:01
i had had the time
17:02
i thought to get the chart but you know
17:04
we’ve seen how the
17:06
uh administrator to teacher ratio has
17:09
gone completely out of control there are
17:11
by a fact i think an entire order of
17:13
magnitude uh
17:14
more administrators than there are than
17:16
there are teachers
17:18
yes uh i forgot the exact number two but
17:21
i know administrators have gone up by
17:22
over 700
17:24
since i think it’s 1982
17:27
student population has gone up barely
17:29
over 100 percent
17:30
and teachers have gone up about 159
17:34
so it’s yeah everything’s going into
17:36
into administration
17:37
to deal with all the paperwork they have
17:39
to deal with right now
17:40
but we don’t want to forget the
17:41
elementary secondary education act which
17:44
was back under lyndon johnson
17:46
that then no child left behind replaced
17:48
which is now the essa
17:50
every student succeeds act supposedly is
17:53
what their what was what they called it
17:55
um is that which we’re currently under
17:57
that replace no child left behind
18:00
what’s crazy is whatever these bills are
18:02
called you can almost rest assured that
18:05
it’s gonna do the opposite so like no
18:07
child left behind
18:08
many children were left behind what was
18:10
this one called every student succeeds
18:11
act every student succeeds act
18:13
so we can we can be almost every student
18:15
fails act i was going to say
18:16
no student succeed act like you know it
18:19
ends up becoming the exact
18:20
opposite of what of what was promised
18:22
like it’s insane to watch this stuff you
18:24
know i
18:24
i just traveled the country uh
18:27
campaigning last year
18:28
for for vice president we came in third
18:29
by the way uh and i
18:31
uh uh i like to say that we came in
18:33
third it was
18:34
far behind in third but we came in third
18:36
every single state anyway whatever that
18:37
doesn’t matter
18:38
i was in 35 different states 75 campaign
18:41
stops and i talked to a ton of teachers
18:43
in fact i even did some
18:44
uh interviews and shows with teachers
18:47
across the country
18:48
and uh and also uh people that were
18:50
heads of
18:51
of of school districts of school boards
18:53
and they said
18:54
we don’t get to do our jobs we’re not
18:56
making decisions what school boards are
18:58
and teachers are largely doing
19:00
is looking at federal and state dictat
19:03
and then figuring out how to actually
19:05
take this and be able to teach children
19:07
with it
19:08
so it becomes an absolute mess i think
19:10
we often
19:11
blame the teachers and i think the
19:13
teachers unions are a big part of the
19:14
problem
19:15
but in my mind and correct me if i’m
19:16
wrong this isn’t a teacher problem this
19:19
is a bureaucracy problem
19:20
am i not correct absolutely correct
19:24
well good uh bureaucracy is the problem
19:27
yeah it’s it’s it’s that was my my uh my
19:31
takeaway from it was that teachers want
19:33
to teach
19:33
students you know are there some lazy
19:35
teachers or whatever sure that’s true of
19:37
any
19:37
any industry any sector of the economy
19:39
whatever that’s true of anything
19:41
but the vast majority of people i talked
19:43
to were incredibly frustrated
19:45
that they weren’t allowed to do their
19:47
jobs the federal government created a
19:49
series of burdens
19:50
and regulations and and they are largely
19:53
just
19:54
test test takers and they are constantly
19:57
threatened with um they’re constantly
20:00
threatened with
20:01
you know funding changes if they don’t
20:02
get certain test results can can you
20:04
talk to us a little
20:05
about why we are seeing an increasing
20:08
amount of children being labeled as
20:09
special needs and being put
20:11
on on you know on in special needs
20:13
classes and being put on medications and
20:15
things like that is that
20:16
related to no child left behind in other
20:18
regulations
20:20
it’s i more related to the how the state
20:22
funding formulas work
20:24
from what i what i understand and have
20:26
seen in the past in local school
20:28
districts
20:29
including the one where i started
20:30
researching it’s because
20:33
they get their foundation level from the
20:35
state
20:36
was here in illinois was about five
20:38
thousand dollars per child
20:40
but if you have a student with an iep
20:43
plan
20:43
because of some type of some type of
20:45
special need that they need
20:47
some of them i saw were actually just
20:49
because the student was shy
20:51
that money then became over eight
20:53
thousand dollars per student
20:54
and sometimes even more so it was an
20:57
incentive to them
20:58
to give kids an iep
21:01
to be able to get more money and then
21:03
the ritalin
21:04
and things like that for students really
21:07
i think that’s more of
21:09
you know they have so much stuff they
21:10
need to get into the classroom
21:13
that they just don’t want to handle kids
21:15
the way they used to anymore and they
21:17
haven’t trained teachers to really
21:18
handle
21:19
kids that are more active and stuff so
21:21
their way to do that
21:22
is to just kind of medicate them so they
21:26
sit down and be quiet and just sit at
21:28
their desk and
21:29
do kind of what they’re told so right
21:31
all these regulations end up
21:33
getting more of the the accelerated kids
21:37
brought back toward the middle where
21:38
they’re trying to get the other kids
21:40
you know kind of brought up to the
21:41
middle hold up yeah but it ends up just
21:43
bringing
21:43
everybody down even the middle gets
21:45
brought down as well because of the way
21:47
everything is being done right now and
21:50
parents
21:51
got to be upset about this actually was
21:52
a recent survey
21:54
that showed if parents had a choice 36
21:58
percent of them would choose a private
22:00
school
22:00
and you’re like 33 of teachers would
22:03
choose a private school
22:04
and that doesn’t count the number that
22:06
would choose a charter school or
22:08
homeschooling
22:09
well so even with all the propaganda
22:12
about uh
22:12
uh private schooling and and school
22:14
choice and things like that that come
22:16
out
22:16
out of the teachers unions a third of of
22:18
teachers are saying that they would
22:20
they would rather deal with a private
22:22
schooling system than
22:23
than deal with the government schooling
22:25
system that is incredible
22:26
you know and another big part about you
22:28
know labeling kids with special needs is
22:30
that
22:30
that exempts them from the testing
22:32
requirements so they get more money
22:34
and they get or or the the testing
22:36
requirements are lower or something like
22:38
that
22:38
yeah the test requirements are different
22:41
but they’re still there no that was one
22:42
of the things they argued about with no
22:43
child left behind
22:45
because even the kids with their ieps
22:47
had to still
22:48
take all the tests and then they were
22:50
counted now they’re kind of part of a
22:52
subgroup
22:52
with under essa but they still do have
22:55
to have the testing
22:56
it’s just kind of counted in different
22:58
ways and that’s why you’ve seen more and
23:00
more schools actually now
23:02
are finally moving to more of the growth
23:04
from the first of the year
23:06
to the end of the year how much the
23:07
student had actually grown
23:09
rather than the standardized test my
23:11
take on standardized tests
23:13
they’re tools for the bureaucrats
23:14
they’re not tools for teachers that’s
23:16
correct and they’re not tools for kids
23:18
you know you you you’ve i i i remember
23:21
and i mean
23:22
i was in a far less you know i i was in
23:24
school in the 80s and 90s
23:26
and late 80s and and through the 90s and
23:29
it was already hard to keep you know
23:32
people are going to be shocked to hear
23:33
this but i was a bit of a precocious kid
23:35
and i ended up by the time middle school
23:37
rolled around they were just handing us
23:39
tests every day we weren’t
23:40
learning things we were being taught to
23:42
memorize stuff
23:43
and we were then you know then we were
23:46
then taking tests
23:47
and you know i thankfully for the most
23:50
part was able to do the test but there
23:51
were kids with testing anxiety
23:53
that you know ended up being put in
23:55
remedial classes and it was just because
23:57
that’s not
23:57
how you teach kids you know and and in
24:00
my personal
24:01
situation i ended up turning to drugs
24:03
mostly because i was
24:04
bored and then as a result of that i
24:06
completely fell off i was telling you
24:08
during the
24:08
you know while we were getting ready to
24:10
start the show that you know if it
24:11
wasn’t for my parents being willing to
24:13
you know intervene and and homeschool me
24:15
a couple times during during
24:17
schooling and especially those last
24:18
couple years in high school i might have
24:20
ended up in juvie i might have ended up
24:22
in this whole
24:23
school-to-prison pipeline and i’m
24:24
grateful to them for that but it
24:26
it hurts me because there are a lot of
24:27
people whose parents aren’t in a
24:29
position to be able to
24:30
you know to be able to do that for them
24:31
and it’s it’s just terrible to see
24:34
talk to us about how common core works
24:37
into it because
24:38
i hear a lot of different things about
24:39
common core and you know i hear
24:41
everything from it’s great too
24:42
it is you know uh it’s you know it’s
24:45
the implementation of communism in our
24:48
schools and everything in between you
24:49
know there’s
24:49
there’s a lot of there’s a lot of
24:51
misunderstanding about what common core
24:53
is
24:53
uh tell us what is common core and and
24:55
you know how has it
24:57
affected education in this country i
24:59
almost said healthcare again i almost
25:00
said healthcare again well
25:01
common core is really kind of a
25:03
guideline and some of it isn’t bad
25:06
but the problems was how it was
25:09
implemented how basically the obama
25:11
administration when they came in
25:12
basically bribed the states to take
25:14
common core
25:15
but the real problem with common core
25:17
was
25:18
it allowed almost every bad curriculum
25:21
ever written
25:22
to be into the schools all they had to
25:24
do was say it was common core aligned
25:26
and schools were buying it whether the
25:28
curriculum was good or bad
25:30
that was really the problem so so some
25:32
of common core was
25:33
was not great the way it was done but
25:36
some of it was actually pretty good
25:38
but the problem is it doesn’t solve the
25:39
problem it still puts the government in
25:42
control
25:42
instead of putting the parent in control
25:44
i mean i to me if a parent wants us
25:46
wants to have a school that
25:47
uses common core aligned curriculum go
25:50
for it
25:51
whatever student you know parent doesn’t
25:53
want a child in that
25:54
then they should be able to go to
25:56
whatever school or whatever other
25:58
entity that’s not teaching common core
26:00
line that’s really the that’s really the
26:02
solution
26:03
common core doesn’t really matter it’s
26:05
whatever these next fads coming down
26:07
the social emotional learning is another
26:09
fad coming down some of that is really
26:11
good
26:12
students actually need to learn how to
26:14
deal with their emotions
26:15
right right again it’s going to be
26:17
misused so
26:19
the parents don’t have any power in this
26:21
situation and that’s the real
26:23
problem here yeah and that’s this is
26:26
what i heard
26:27
over and over again on the campaign
26:29
trail from teachers from parents
26:31
uh from some i had some high school
26:33
students that came out and asked me
26:34
questions about it
26:35
and what they said is essentially there
26:37
were many different ways that they said
26:39
it but it was all basically the same
26:40
thing
26:41
we have no control over our schools it’s
26:44
not
26:44
working our children are falling behind
26:48
um you know those who understood how the
26:50
global marketplace is working are like
26:52
our kids are wholly
26:54
unprepared for the the the work that the
26:57
labor
26:58
competition environment of the future
26:59
even just in this country especially
27:01
uh and not to mention in other countries
27:03
um it you know and and
27:05
it’s costing us a fortune our property
27:07
taxes are going through the roof
27:08
supposedly to pay for all this
27:10
and yet it is increasingly substandard
27:12
so i think that there is and that’s why
27:14
you know polling shows that things like
27:16
uh like uh school choice like uh you
27:19
know homeschooling co-ops and things
27:20
like that
27:21
are increasingly popular despite
27:23
billions of dollars being spent on
27:25
pro-government propaganda saying no no
27:27
the problem is
27:28
we just need more of your money that’s
27:29
you know it’s not it’s not the problem
27:31
with this race car isn’t that the engine
27:33
is broken and the transmission fell out
27:35
we need more we need to pour more gas on
27:37
top of the car
27:38
that will fix this yeah parents don’t
27:40
even understand how much money is being
27:42
spent
27:42
in the in the public school system right
27:44
now anyway
27:46
i mean there are schools in illinois
27:47
that are spending like over a little
27:49
over four thousand dollars per student
27:50
and are doing fine
27:52
there’s other schools that are spending
27:53
over twenty thousand dollars a student
27:55
and aren’t and if you ever ask a
27:58
superintendent one question i used to
27:59
love to ask superintendents and um
28:02
teachers and anybody
28:03
high up in education was how much money
28:06
is enough you keep saying you want more
28:08
how much money is enough and i’ve only
28:12
had one
28:12
person actually answer that question
28:14
because most of them are always going to
28:15
be the answer is always more
28:17
so what what just out of curiosity what
28:20
was their answer to that
28:22
their answer was about 21 000 per
28:25
student and when i pointed out that that
28:27
was actually chicago public schools
28:29
that part of them were almost at twenty
28:30
one thousand dollars and washington dc
28:32
was over thirty thousand dollars they
28:34
were starting to backtrack and say oh
28:36
well
28:36
well it depends on the student they
28:38
immediately started backtracking once i
28:40
confronted them with that number
28:43
21 000 a new car
28:46
per student every year yep
28:50
i mean private schools operate for a lot
28:52
less than that
28:53
yeah most private schools are under 10
28:55
000 actually most private schools
28:57
actually cost less than any public
29:00
school to operate and most parents don’t
29:02
understand that
29:03
they the teachers union and their
29:05
propaganda against like oh
29:06
private schools are only very expensive
29:08
oh they’re rich elite students
29:11
and most of the majority of them aren’t
29:13
there are a few yes
29:14
absolutely but the majority aren’t the
29:16
majority are trying to help students and
29:18
their tuition is
29:19
less per year than than what public
29:21
schools are spending per year
29:23
and that’s why they’re competing with a
29:24
monopoly that
29:26
that can just suck money from people you
29:28
know at will whenever they want to
29:30
and yet they still are able to
29:31
outperform that entity surprisingly
29:33
enough so it’s almost like government
29:35
you know i i you know i often say i i
29:38
was
29:39
right before the show i tried putting
29:40
together a comprehensive list of things
29:42
that government does not suck at
29:44
and uh the pen didn’t work because i got
29:46
it from the government
29:47
um no so listen we’re so we i think we i
29:50
think we’ve kind of driven home the fact
29:52
that government has done a bad job at
29:54
this but
29:55
you know let’s talk solutions what are
29:57
some of the
29:58
free market solutions to education that
30:01
can that can
30:02
create serious reforms and improve
30:05
the educational outcomes of students and
30:07
and teachers and parents
30:09
well the simple idea is fun children not
30:12
systems
30:13
right but then it’s you get into the
30:15
mechanisms of how you do it and there’s
30:17
lots of different ways a lot of people
30:18
like to
30:19
like the voucher method that was the
30:20
kind of the one of the early ones
30:22
started back in indiana in 1990 or not
30:26
in india
30:26
milwaukee voucher started in milwaukee
30:29
and there’s a few states with vouchers
30:30
and stuff there’s about 188 000 kids
30:32
nationwide that are on vouchers
30:35
vouchers are really a just a basic
30:37
certificate where the government says i
30:38
will pay for your child to go to another
30:40
school
30:42
those are very highly regulated and
30:44
those are really not
30:45
a good free market solution they’re
30:47
better than
30:48
nothing but they’re right good free
30:50
market solution
30:51
getting into education savings accounts
30:54
has kind of been a better
30:55
method because then the student the
30:58
parent controls a fund
31:00
where all the money is in that for the
31:01
child they can spend it on
31:03
books uniforms the tuition
31:07
uh travel back and forth even for
31:09
specialized
31:10
therapies which is used on a lot of
31:12
states especially arizona oklahoma that
31:15
does
31:15
does some of this and then there’s tax
31:17
credit scholarships
31:19
which is a where private donors give
31:22
money to a scholarship
31:24
granting organization that then they get
31:27
a tax credit
31:29
typically it’s not always dollar for
31:31
dollar but it’s some percentage of a
31:33
dollar
31:33
on that on their state taxes
31:37
so the states are basically saying we’ll
31:38
give you this credit but you’re giving
31:40
money specifically for education
31:43
florida has the largest tax credit
31:44
scholarship program now with over a
31:46
hundred thousand
31:47
students and there’s about 275 000
31:50
nationwide in tax credit
31:52
scholarship programs there’s actually 24
31:55
programs in 19 states now
31:57
with tax credit scholarships and so
32:00
those are very very useful they’re
32:02
usually typically just go to tuition
32:04
so there’s a new thing that hasn’t
32:06
passed yet that’s a really good idea
32:09
is tax credit scholarships to actually
32:11
fund
32:12
an education savings account so the
32:15
donors are giving money
32:16
for the tax credit scholarship that’s in
32:18
funds but funding
32:19
a fund for the parents to then control
32:22
through this organization so it’s it’s
32:25
legit and everybody knows it’s going for
32:27
educational purposes
32:29
that’s kind of the newest free market
32:31
solution it’s probably the best of both
32:33
worlds
32:34
of the least regulation and still
32:38
providing exactly what kids need more so
32:41
than just a trash cutter scholarship and
32:43
definitely more so than just a voucher
32:45
and and that coupled with i would
32:47
imagine
32:48
deregulation you know removing the
32:50
federal regulations and everything
32:52
and or at least removing the bulk of
32:54
them and getting rid of a lot of the
32:55
statewide
32:56
regulations and kind of decentralizing
32:59
allowing individual school districts
33:01
uh to to decide what their educations
33:03
look like and and be empowered with
33:05
their own funding to do so
33:06
yeah that would be helpful but that’s
33:08
not happening anytime soon
33:10
before we get to deregulation we’re
33:12
going to have to have more kids that
33:14
are basically using tax credit
33:16
scholarships in esa and education choice
33:18
before the deregulation really happens
33:21
several states do have open enrollment
33:23
where a school kid in one school
33:24
district can actually
33:26
apply for another school district and go
33:28
to school over in another district as
33:30
long as they
33:31
have room for students and can take more
33:33
students and stuff so
33:34
that’s kind of one to one one method
33:37
within the public school system that is
33:39
allowing
33:40
more choice as well too there but we had
33:42
a long way to go before we ever get to
33:44
really actually deregulating state codes
33:46
and then federal codes
33:48
and getting them out of the way of the
33:49
education system i want it now
33:52
i want the whole thing now so i i meant
33:55
so you mentioned school choice and and
33:57
how you didn’t think it’s a free market
33:59
solution and i am with you my friend
34:00
because
34:01
i’ve talked with a lot of people who are
34:02
like school choice school choice school
34:04
choice
34:04
you know uh assign the money to the
34:07
students instead of the
34:08
instead of the uh the schools and yes i
34:10
agree with that and like you said is it
34:12
better is it the i guess lesser evil of
34:14
what we have now
34:14
absolutely here’s my fear of it long
34:16
term and you can tell me
34:17
if i’m just being a conspiracy nut uh or
34:20
if i’m right
34:21
my concern is that if school choice was
34:24
to become
34:25
standardized across the country you
34:27
would very quickly have
34:29
the federal government being or i guess
34:31
either however it’s implemented either
34:33
the federal government or the individual
34:34
state governments
34:36
being the main uh uh funding for
34:40
uh source of private schools and even if
34:43
it didn’t start this way eventually very
34:45
quickly
34:46
that money would come with strings so
34:48
not only would you now have
34:49
uh government involvement more
34:51
government involvement in private
34:53
schools with the strings attached to the
34:54
funding
34:55
uh and and would you now increasingly
34:57
have private schools geared towards
35:00
the government as the real client
35:02
instead of the the parents and the
35:03
students
35:04
but by implementing that they will have
35:07
gotten rid of the the
35:08
the only bastion of free market
35:10
education left besides homeschooling
35:12
is that not i mean it’s like a camel’s
35:15
nose under the tent type of thing is
35:16
that not a legit concern
35:19
it is a legit concern but the way around
35:22
it vouchers are the most regulated
35:24
vouchers are kind of
35:25
what that there would be a lot more
35:28
regulations on vouchers than any other
35:29
type
35:30
if you go tax credit scholarships right
35:33
and then them funding esas
35:35
it’s going to be very very difficult to
35:37
ever regulate those
35:39
because the donors would stop giving and
35:41
stuff too it would be almost impossible
35:43
for the governments to start regulating
35:45
those
35:46
and the other fact is that most of those
35:48
programs are
35:49
well all the programs are at the state
35:51
level not the federal level
35:53
so if the federal government tried to
35:55
regulate them the state could go
35:56
no our program’s working great you’re
35:58
not touching it we’re not
36:00
dealing with this so it’s kind of
36:02
insulated
36:03
that way by being at state level
36:05
programs that’s why
36:07
as you know education reform advocate i
36:10
would rather work at the state level
36:11
than the federal level
36:13
i know president trump tried to talk
36:14
about a lot about school choice and
36:16
stuff like that but it’s still
36:18
so much better and less regulated at the
36:20
state level
36:21
and keeping the federal government
36:22
completely out of it so i would say
36:24
that’s the way to go about
36:26
it is ignore what the feds are doing
36:28
kind of keep them at
36:29
keep them doing whatever they’re doing
36:30
and keep them out of school choice
36:32
and keep it all at the state level
36:34
absolutely as much as possible and that
36:36
will prevent
36:37
those regulations from creeping in and
36:40
you know going to the the federal model
36:43
of things instead of having one top-down
36:45
solution
36:46
you’ve got 50 top-down solutions which
36:48
are still better than you know just the
36:50
one
36:50
and you know different states can see
36:52
what’s working what’s not working and
36:54
tailored as they see fit and if we’re
36:56
already moving in again i want
36:58
everything now
36:59
if we’re already moving in the path of
37:00
deregulating down to the state level or
37:03
or or giving funding and you know
37:05
putting the funding
37:06
at the state level instead of you know
37:09
more and more at the federal level
37:10
that kind of creates the momentum to say
37:12
hey what if we did this at the
37:14
school district level and hey do we need
37:17
40 of the regulations to come from an
37:19
entity that isn’t really doing anything
37:21
to help you the way but i i’m a dreamer
37:23
i’m a dreamer but yeah well actually
37:25
actually douglas county colorado
37:27
actually passed a school choice program
37:29
within
37:30
their schools within their school system
37:32
that went all the way to the supreme
37:34
court
37:35
but it died at this well it got sent
37:37
back to
37:39
the state supreme court of colorado at
37:42
the same time of trinity lutheran
37:44
case they said this was wrongly decided
37:46
you need to go back and look at this
37:48
case based on the trinity lutheran
37:50
one which was the kind of the precursor
37:52
to espinoza which got rid of the blaine
37:54
amendments
37:55
so it was the kind of beginning of that
37:57
and what happened in douglas county
37:58
colorado
37:59
because it came back the teachers union
38:01
went into that next school board race
38:04
and decimated the mod they throw so much
38:07
money in it that their candidates won
38:11
they ended the program so then it was no
38:13
there wasn’t anything
38:14
to fight for at the supreme court
38:16
anymore and that and it was gone
38:18
so it can be done at the school district
38:20
level but it’s much much harder to deal
38:22
with that than at the state level but
38:23
yes
38:24
some counties have tried it so it’s
38:27
because
38:28
the states have the wherewithal to fight
38:30
against the teachers unions if push
38:32
comes to shove whereas some of the
38:33
school districts they just get crowded
38:35
out and they can’t really do it
38:36
yeah it’s hard on a school on a school
38:38
board race level it is really really
38:40
hard to fight the teachers union
38:42
um it’s one of the things i did actually
38:44
when i was doing it and realized
38:46
it’s you can only fight and beat the
38:47
teachers union so many times
38:49
they’re just going to wait and keep
38:50
coming back and and take over the school
38:53
boards
38:54
in just a year two years or four years
38:56
they’re going to have control of the
38:57
school board again no matter how many
38:59
how much you beat them by it’s it’s
39:01
almost impossible that’s why you kind of
39:02
got to go up to the state level
39:04
to really have a longer term impact
39:08
it is hard to compete against an
39:10
opponent that is able to take money from
39:12
you at any time
39:13
to fund their own aims right like if
39:15
we’re playing monopoly
39:17
and it comes around to my turn and i go
39:19
all right well i’m going to take 2 000
39:20
of lenny’s dollars and i’m going to buy
39:22
park place like you know that that that
39:24
doesn’t that’s not that doesn’t work
39:26
very well so
39:27
um so let’s talk homeschooling a little
39:30
bit
39:31
um where does homeschooling fit into all
39:33
of this
39:34
and are there policies that can be
39:36
implemented
39:38
and in fact these esas that you’re
39:39
talking about is that something that can
39:40
be used at
39:41
school as well and if so what what other
39:43
things can as well
39:45
yes esa’s could be used for
39:47
homeschooling
39:48
and in fact they are used in some states
39:50
for homeschooling
39:51
most homeschoolers though are not going
39:54
to want to do that what actually okay
39:56
what actually really works
39:57
great for homeschoolers are individual
40:00
tax credits or individual tax deductions
40:02
credits are better
40:03
where illinois we actually have one and
40:05
i use that because i ended up
40:06
homeschooling my two children
40:08
as well for uh actually starting in my
40:11
oldest for starting in fourth grade
40:13
all the way through twelfth grade we
40:14
homeschooled her and my other one after
40:16
kindergarten all the way through high
40:17
school
40:18
but it’s a tax credit so whenever i
40:20
spent anything education related
40:23
i just saved my receipt at the end of
40:25
the year i’m writing
40:26
writing that off on my taxes up to 500
40:30
per student with a few other caveats in
40:32
there but
40:34
um so that was pretty much it so it was
40:36
great for me and actually illinois has
40:38
almost 300 000 people taking advantage
40:42
of that
40:42
individual education tax credit and
40:45
illinois is actually one of the best
40:46
homeschooling states in the country
40:48
surprisingly given how draconian and a
40:51
lot of our stuff here’s
40:53
yeah i’m surprised by that here in
40:54
illinois so
40:56
really yes is that just because of the
41:00
regulatory structure that allows them to
41:02
do it or
41:03
or what led to that fight battles back
41:05
in the 80s
41:06
to open up homeschooling and making
41:09
homeschooling legal
41:10
and ones one thing that’s really
41:13
actually kind of nice here in illinois
41:14
is home schools are considered private
41:17
schools
41:18
there is no such thing as homeschool in
41:21
the
41:22
legislative language legal language in
41:24
illinois whatsoever
41:26
you are a private school and that’s one
41:29
thing that’s protected homeschoolers
41:31
since the 1980s when it became legal
41:34
here and why illinois is one of the best
41:36
homeschooling states
41:37
just to give you an example a few years
41:39
ago it was well actually 2012
41:42
a legislator decided they wanted all
41:44
homeschoolers in illinois to register
41:46
so they filed the bill one of the
41:49
secretaries
41:50
called one of the homeschooling groups a
41:52
week later 4 000 homeschoolers
41:55
were standing in the rotunda singing
41:57
songs and talking to legislators
41:59
and the bill was pulled while they were
42:01
still on the in the rotunda
42:03
having their rally just because they saw
42:05
the power of what homeschoolers can do
42:07
when they band together
42:08
and that’s the one thing that you know
42:10
across tax credit scholarships esa
42:12
any type of school choice that kind of
42:15
momentum that
42:16
kind of numbers will shift power at a
42:18
state level very quickly
42:20
to make sure they cannot add regulation
42:24
to school choice and to homeschooling
42:26
that way
42:27
and the interesting thing is um that was
42:30
also
42:31
you know the i’m sure the homeschoolers
42:33
and their kids that went to the
42:34
to the rally to protest that also was
42:36
like their
42:37
their lesson for the day right so it
42:39
kind of two birds with one stone
42:40
this is the thing with homeschoolers
42:42
they’re at home so if
42:44
if they find out that there’s something
42:46
that’s infringing on their rights
42:48
they can say hey kids uh we’re going to
42:50
capitol hill or we’re going to this you
42:52
know this
42:52
the state house or we’re going to
42:53
wherever uh and that’s going to be
42:55
today’s lesson
42:56
is to you know is is is you know our
42:58
civic duty to fight against
43:00
infringements
43:00
and encroachments on our rights and our
43:02
ability to do things you know they are
43:03
they’re uniquely suited like they’re
43:05
literally at home they can
43:06
they can go they you know they’re
43:08
they’re they’re not saying oh well you
43:09
know
43:10
the kids are in school and i’m at work
43:11
they’re at home teaching the kids so you
43:13
know
43:13
it it’s it’s kind of ideal they’re like
43:15
the last people that you would want to
43:17
tick off
43:17
because they can just go with the kids
43:19
they can pack up the van
43:20
and come to capitol hill and uh and and
43:23
and sing songs and
43:24
and march and rally until you until you
43:26
you take the bill down that’s that’s
43:28
hilarious
43:29
yes there’s also the other side of that
43:31
though when public schools
43:33
have a bill here in illinois they again
43:35
i mean that this happens in other states
43:36
too
43:37
is when they wanted something passed
43:40
they wanted here to increase taxes
43:42
is they actually bust students down
43:46
for a field trip day to the capital and
43:49
there were hundreds and hundreds of kids
43:50
there
43:51
arne duncan was actually famous for
43:52
doing this when he was secretary
43:54
but he was education for the president
43:56
in chicago running security public
43:58
schools
43:58
he would do that he would bust kids down
44:00
there by the hundreds
44:02
so they could go talk to legislators to
44:04
try to get tax increases
44:07
this is well so we’re doing the opposite
44:09
instead of coming in buses we’re coming
44:10
in you know
44:11
uh uh thousands of minivans and and cars
44:14
and so forth and the thing is like
44:16
when you talk to a homeschooled kid and
44:18
this isn’t
44:19
always but you often find that
44:22
they are first of all they’re usually
44:24
more comfortable talking with adults
44:26
because they’re they’re they’re having a
44:28
rapport with adults instead of that
44:30
really weird
44:31
top-down thing that is used in the
44:33
prussian model of schooling
44:34
where you’re just kind of there and and
44:36
there’s this authority figure and you
44:37
never really get to question why they’re
44:39
an authority figure they just
44:40
are and you know they hand you these
44:42
things that you have to
44:44
use a number two pencil on and then the
44:46
bell rings and you gotta go
44:47
to the next thing because you’re being
44:48
institutionalized right so
44:50
there’s this sort of like disconnect
44:52
between you know
44:53
students and adults you know adults are
44:55
this you know this
44:57
it’s sort of like in in peanuts like you
44:58
know you don’t even really hear their
44:59
voice
45:01
and it’s like you just do what they say
45:02
and and whatever whereas in
45:03
homeschooling
45:04
i have found that they often have and i
45:06
can from personal experience
45:08
i was talking with my dad about stuff
45:11
he i was asking him questions we would
45:13
find out together
45:15
instead of him having to pretend he knew
45:16
everything to try to keep some kind of
45:18
power balance he’d be like
45:20
i don’t know let’s go find out and we
45:21
and you know this was pre-internet we’d
45:23
go to the library and find things out
45:25
it was education was fun and i learned
45:27
so much more
45:28
and it took far less time every single
45:30
day to be able to do
45:32
it i would i would cruise through things
45:34
because learning was
45:35
cool it was fun i liked waking up and
45:37
finding out stuff and i had way more
45:39
free time to then go spend time with
45:41
friends afterwards
45:42
yep yeah there was an op-ed here a
45:44
couple years ago i read about a college
45:46
professor
45:47
used to fight against homeschooling all
45:49
the time but when he moved to
45:50
cal to teaching at college he kept
45:53
trying to get the students to interact
45:55
with them
45:55
and he it was they weren’t they weren’t
45:57
interacting with him
45:58
right until he had this one student that
46:00
just kept asking him questions and kept
46:02
having conversations with him the whole
46:04
time during class
46:05
and finally he asked that student why
46:08
are you comfortable asking all these
46:09
questions
46:10
when your peers aren’t and they were
46:12
like oh i was homeschooled
46:14
and now he’s an advocate for
46:15
homeschooling because of that experience
46:17
he had personal experience
46:19
of that intergenerational learning that
46:22
homeschoolers have had
46:24
yeah i i i have a theory that the reason
46:27
that
46:28
i and i’m a millennial so i’m not
46:29
crapping on millennials i’m just a very
46:31
old millennial i’m a millennial with
46:33
male pattern baldness right like i’m i’m
46:35
i’m that first wave like i think i think
46:38
82 was the first year for millennials so
46:40
first yeah so i’m like the first i was
46:43
the first millennial to run
46:44
for for on a national ticket and that’s
46:47
not because there’s anything special
46:48
about me it’s just i this is the first
46:49
time millennials qualified so here i am
46:51
um you know for the 35 plus age thing um
46:55
all that to say it seems like a lot of
46:57
kids that are in there in their
46:59
kids a lot of people that are in their
47:01
like mid 20s late teens
47:03
there’s this weird disconnect a lot of
47:05
them have with adults
47:07
and i think it’s entirely based on the
47:09
fact that they were so institutionalized
47:11
in the school system
47:12
and and and their interactions with the
47:14
people in the school system
47:16
outnumbered their interactions with
47:17
parents and other positive role models
47:20
twenty to one that even as adults now
47:23
they still have a weird interaction with
47:25
other adults because
47:26
they’re not used to it and and i think
47:28
that you know this go i mean
47:30
this is a social thing even more so than
47:32
an education thing
47:33
but it’s what happens when you put kids
47:35
in cubicles
47:36
and and treat them and basically prepare
47:38
them for a a life
47:40
of either factory work or going into the
47:43
military which is what the prussian
47:44
model is based on
47:45
and then shove them into a 21st century
47:47
environment that has nothing that does
47:48
not line up even remotely with that
47:51
yeah but that’s kind of the prussian
47:53
model it’s basically
47:54
you want kids smart enough to be able to
47:57
do their jobs but
47:58
not smart enough to be the boss
48:00
basically to start their own jobs and
48:02
start their own businesses
48:03
is really kind of that model you’re
48:05
creating widgets
48:06
that’s and that’s they’re treated like
48:08
kids are treated like widgets a lot of
48:09
times
48:10
especially with the funding they’re all
48:11
basically funding widgets
48:13
is how the government funds schools
48:15
right now because it’s
48:16
based on the number of children you have
48:19
which is the wrong way to fund
48:21
yeah we treat kids like statistics and
48:23
the stats are bad
48:24
and and that’s that’s a really really
48:26
bad thing so uh
48:28
lenny look before i before i give you a
48:30
chance to give your final thoughts let’s
48:32
see if we have any questions here uh
48:34
we’ve got some people
48:35
that are calling you education santa
48:39
uh so that’s good um
48:42
um let’s see uh so sherry conover
48:46
charlo i hope you’re saying i’m saying
48:48
your name correctly sherry says i was on
48:49
the school board for a catholic
48:51
elementary our kids spent 60 hours on
48:53
the state required test
48:54
plus another 12-hour test for third
48:56
graders our vouchers came in
48:58
teachers had to teach reading for 90
49:00
straight minutes this is for as young as
49:03
kindergarten
49:04
granted reading activities didn’t have
49:05
to be sit down yet it’s too much on the
49:07
same
49:08
topic imagine it’s a snow delay and the
49:10
teacher still has to teach 90 minutes
49:12
straight
49:12
add lunch and recess and that leaves
49:14
very little time left for crucial
49:16
i don’t know what steam classes are you
49:18
probably do
49:19
yeah this uh yeah the stem and steam
49:22
it’s art
49:24
math um science technology
49:27
oh it’s stem but with it’s stem but with
49:30
art as oh
49:31
right okay sam what with arts yes okay
49:35
so it’s just you know like you said that
49:37
the issue
49:38
is funding is a part of it and and the
49:40
strings attached that come with it
49:42
but ultimately we’re not going to get
49:44
the solutions we want until we get what
49:46
i want which is the full
49:47
you know or at least the beginning the
49:48
process of deregulation and putting the
49:50
power
49:51
back in the hands of of educators and
49:54
parents
49:54
to be able to empower students to
49:56
actually learn and
49:58
and enjoy education instead of seeing it
50:00
as a as an institution
50:02
yeah and the bigger the more kids to
50:04
take advantage of education choice the
50:06
faster you will get
50:07
deregulation exactly yeah well it starts
50:10
the process people realize oh crap
50:12
the problem wasn’t money the problem was
50:14
who was in charge of it
50:15
and you know let’s let’s keep working
50:17
that way yeah i like how you think
50:19
a lot of that parents have seen a lot of
50:21
that with the pandemic when their kids
50:23
are at home now they get to see
50:24
exactly what the classes are and what
50:26
they’re having to do to help the kids
50:28
so they’re starting to get a taste of it
50:30
and then we’re way
50:31
you know waiting to see what’s really
50:33
going to happen because it looks like
50:34
the numbers so far
50:36
there’s an extra four or five percent
50:38
that are now moving to homeschooling
50:41
there’s a lot of kids just being
50:42
completely left behind and
50:44
the schools don’t know where they are
50:46
and stuff right now because they just
50:48
kind of dropped out already which is
50:49
really going to be bad for society over
50:51
time
50:52
the economics of this learning loss and
50:54
what the pandemic is doing is going to
50:56
be very very drastic and very very hard
50:58
on a lot of students
50:59
and especially the low-income and poor
51:01
students which is why school choice is
51:03
even more important
51:05
because take honest the rich already
51:07
have school choice
51:08
they can go and pay for whatever they
51:09
want yes the low income that don’t have
51:11
school choice that need the school
51:13
choice that need those options
51:15
that they’re not getting right now and
51:17
because the funding is tied to the
51:18
schools they are essentially
51:19
segregated into bad failing schools
51:22
they’re being told hey look
51:23
if you’re poor tough stop being poor
51:27
well how am i going to stop being poor
51:28
if i and my kids can’t get a proper
51:30
education
51:31
to be able to to to learn you know
51:33
before we even get into all the
51:34
economic policies that are leading to
51:36
you know entrenching people in poverty
51:38
just looking at education
51:39
they’re not able to get the educational
51:41
tools they need to be able to seek the
51:42
jobs of the future to do that and we
51:44
tell them eh
51:45
tough stop being poor so if nothing else
51:47
tying the funding to the students
51:49
instead of to
51:50
you know uh to to uh to the uh schools
51:53
if nothing else solves that or at least
51:55
greatly ameliorates that problem
51:57
and it forces those schools to either be
51:59
good or
52:00
go out of business and be replaced with
52:02
one that is exactly and public schools
52:04
right now don’t have that since they
52:06
they have no fallback they’re just going
52:08
to keep getting money
52:09
they’re not going to get closed where
52:11
public schools and
52:12
private schools and charter schools all
52:14
of them will close if they hit lose
52:16
students
52:16
they’re going to close but you mentioned
52:18
segregation
52:19
a minute ago and this is something i’ve
52:21
talked about a lot there was actually
52:23
just a study done
52:24
that showed you know 1968 before
52:28
all of the desegregation and everything
52:29
happened 77
52:31
of black students were in predominantly
52:33
white schools
52:35
that dropped all the way down to 63
52:37
percent in 1988 when they were really
52:40
trying to
52:40
really trying to desegregate you know
52:42
integrate the schools a lot
52:44
better and that was working in the 1988s
52:46
but 2018
52:48
that number is back to 81 percent so
52:51
public schools right now
52:52
are more segregated now than they were
52:56
in 1968 wow
53:04
and now and now you can’t point to it as
53:08
an evil you can’t say look they’re
53:09
forcing
53:10
you know black kids to be in substandard
53:12
schooling you go oh well this is just
53:14
the reality of our system well the re
53:15
the de facto reality
53:17
is segregation into substandard schools
53:20
with no effective way to be able to
53:22
change it until we change the way that
53:23
the funding is even happening
53:25
that is exactly wow
53:28
see this is the problem i i’m already a
53:31
libertarian right
53:32
but then i get people like you on the
53:34
show who drive
53:35
down into even greater detail how much
53:38
government sucks at stuff and it makes
53:39
me even more libertarian so you know i’m
53:41
trying to stay relatable lenny like come
53:42
on man
53:43
uh lenny listen this was fantastic this
53:46
is exactly i think you are
53:48
obviously an expert on this and your
53:50
ideas
53:51
uh are exactly it sounds like what we
53:53
need to do to at least start the
53:55
incremental process
53:56
because as much as i hate it we’re not
53:58
going to snap our fingers and have you
53:59
know fully decentralized schooling
54:01
overnight but
54:02
we can at least start the process of
54:03
moving to that so hey man thanks so much
54:05
for coming on before i let you go
54:07
i want to give you a chance to give your
54:09
final word uh
54:11
anything that you feel like we didn’t
54:12
get a chance to say if there’s anything
54:14
you’d like to promote
54:15
plug your your website your pages
54:18
anything that you want to say
54:19
anything you want to promote lenny
54:21
jarrett the floor
54:22
is
54:23
[Laughter]
54:25
well it is it really comes down to the
54:28
simple fact of
54:29
we have the solution already to fix
54:31
education it’s funding children
54:33
not systems and then that will drive
54:35
everything else it’ll drive the
54:36
deregulation it’ll drive the state back
54:38
out of controlling
54:39
local control it puts parents in charge
54:42
so we’re
54:43
empowering the parents to do what they
54:45
need to do to make sure their child gets
54:46
the best education
54:48
because they know how what your best
54:50
education is for their child
54:51
better than somebody in their state
54:52
capital and certainly better than
54:54
somebody in washington dc
54:56
but if you ever want more information
54:57
actually i work for a great organization
54:59
ace scholarships
55:00
out of denver and they work in eight
55:02
states and they provide scholarships to
55:05
low-income
55:05
students that gives these students the
55:08
opportunity
55:09
to be able to get a better choice to get
55:13
a better education
55:14
and it completely changes not only them
55:17
it actually changes their parents
55:19
parents of these students that ace uses
55:22
are in three years they’re going back
55:25
and getting their own degrees they’re
55:27
increasing their job opportunities
55:28
increasing their
55:29
own income because of the education that
55:32
they’re seeing
55:33
in their children in the opportunities
55:35
right their children are getting so
55:36
yeah ace scholarships.org if anybody’s
55:38
interested in coming and looking at more
55:40
information
55:41
and helping really helping low-income
55:44
students
55:45
outside you need not without waiting for
55:47
state regulations a lot of our
55:49
most likely the most of our programs are
55:51
private programs
55:52
so we’re helping students that are right
55:54
now public schools and helping them get
55:56
to private schools
55:57
regardless of what the government says
56:00
do or don’t do
56:01
we’re already just doing it regardless
56:02
anyway and people are donating and
56:04
putting their money where their mouth is
56:06
and actually helping students
56:07
right now that is awesome man where can
56:10
people find you
56:11
personally because what i’m getting is
56:13
we need more lenny
56:15
where can we find lenny we love lenny
56:17
lenny lenny lenny like literally someone
56:19
wrote lenny lenny lenny
56:20
where can people find you man i’ve kind
56:23
of most of my political stuff and
56:25
everything i’ve done outside i’ve kind
56:27
of
56:27
i kind of kind of gotten away from all
56:30
of that
56:31
but there is a universal education
56:33
choice page
56:35
on facebook that you can find and follow
56:37
my stuff there when i post about
56:39
education choice
56:40
or at a scholarship it’s actually act
56:43
act.a scholarships.org and you can look
56:47
there
56:47
and all the studies and all the work i’m
56:49
doing at ace um
56:50
and writing and stuff that is there as
56:53
well
56:54
so okay so the two places to find me
56:57
universal school choice
56:59
universal education choice universal
57:01
education choice on facebook and
57:04
act scholarships on facebook
57:07
no it’s well it’s act.ace
57:09
scholarships.org on the
57:11
website web address oh is it what is the
57:13
website okay yeah we got
57:15
team lenny you’re a hit lenny everyone
57:17
loves you this is now
57:18
so from now on folks this is going to be
57:19
my fellow americans with lenny jarrett
57:21
i’m going to retire
57:22
um everyone loves gen everyone loves
57:24
lenny um lenny can we get you back on
57:26
hopefully in the near future sure
57:29
absolutely i’d love it
57:31
i think that’d be fantastic man hey
57:32
thanks so much for coming on
57:34
i really appreciate you stick around i’m
57:35
gonna talk with you during the outro
57:37
uh but thank you again man you are you
57:38
are fantastic you just got
57:40
hundreds of new fans uh actually
57:42
thousands of new fans you just got a lot
57:44
of new fans lenny
57:45
um but folks thank you so much for
57:47
tuning into this episode of my fellow
57:48
americans
57:49
uh i i had a really great time talking
57:51
about education
57:52
once again shocker to no one the problem
57:55
is that power and money and
57:57
opportunities and freedom have been
57:58
taken out of the hands
57:59
of the people put in the hands of
58:01
politicians and bureaucrats and cronies
58:03
and the solution equally not a surprise
58:06
is to take that power back which is what
58:08
we talk about on this show
58:09
uh every single time i go live because
58:11
that’s my thing
58:12
uh so thank you again for tuning in to
58:14
this episode what do we have coming up
58:16
um let’s see so on uh
58:20
tomorrow i will be on a very special
58:22
episode of the chris and jesse
58:24
kristen spikey show with spike and
58:26
chrissy uh
58:27
that will be uh tomorrow at i believe 8
58:29
p.m and
58:30
why don’t i just pull up the cam i’m
58:31
sitting there fumbling through trying to
58:33
remember what i’m doing let me just pull
58:34
up the calendar
58:35
everyone keeps trying everyone is used
58:37
to me having no idea what i’m doing no
58:39
i’m wrong it’s at eight on friday
58:44
next tomorrow at eight i’m gonna be on
58:45
the post political podcast
58:48
and that is live so check that out
58:51
um and i will also be on uh the chris
58:53
and spiky show with spike and chrissy on
58:55
friday and then i’m gonna take the
58:57
weekend
58:58
oh no i’m doing stuff on the weekend too
58:59
but nothing that’s live uh and then join
59:01
me next
59:02
uh monday for culture of winning where i
59:05
talk with
59:06
libertarians who get elected to office
59:08
to demystify that idea of libertarians
59:10
winning and talk to them about how we
59:11
can build a blueprint for libertarians
59:13
to win
59:14
across the country uh my guest next
59:16
monday will be aaron
59:17
wright uh and then join us next tuesday
59:20
at 8 pm eastern for the muddy waters of
59:22
freedom
59:23
where uh matt wright and i parse through
59:25
the week’s events
59:26
like the 2020 wonder boys that we are
59:28
and then
59:29
tune in next week right here same spike
59:32
place
59:32
same spike time for another episode of
59:35
my fellow americans
59:37
with jason speier folks thanks again for
59:39
tuning in i’m spike cohen
59:41
and you are the power god bless guys
59:46
[Music]
60:01
[Music]
60:12
away
60:15
[Music]
60:29
[Music]
60:32
[Applause]
60:44
[Music]
60:51
[Music]
60:54
come
60:59
[Music]
61:05
[Music]
61:08
sometimes darkness is all i find you
61:10
know what they say about an hour for a
61:12
night in a time where the blind
61:13
blood who am i to deny with growl when a
61:15
loved one dies i recognize that body
61:17
outside with the holes in the body that
61:19
was alive
61:20
now confined to a chalk outline find out
61:22
how but you never
61:34
i’m in love
61:48
[Music]
61:55
tell me why
62:07
[Music]
62:13
make a change
62:21
[Music]
62:26
we will make
62:40
[Music]
62:53
you


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Spike Cohen
Spike Cohen
Local Jew. Contrarian stoic sentimentalist. Antidisestablishmentarianism. 2020 Libertarian VP candidate. Will pet your dog.
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